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TANDBERG 3014 Cassette Recorder Deck - $1000 (Lincoln, NE)

TANDBERG 3014 Cassette Recorder Deck - $1000 (Lincoln, NE)



  TANDBERG 3014 Cassette Recorder Deck - $1000 Lincoln, NE
 

 
Ad id: 3009173251500678
Views: 12
Price
$1,000.00

Tandberg #3014 just back from the shop (Alltronix in Lincoln) for inspection:
Replaced belts and pressure rollers, repaired VU meters, cleaned, lubricated, calibrated and aligned mechanism tested for proper operation.
There are two missing screws on side case (see images) a few small nicks on top(see image), and a scratch on left side (see image). Otherwise, this deck is in tip top condition!

I will be happy to answer questions, but please note I am not an expert on this machine. See notes below for details. I have the receipt from Alltronix Repair. They have done a professional job of combing through this cassette deck.
Produced 1982-85. Retail $1,595.
From the excellent HiFi-Classic website:
"The Tandberg TCD 3014 cassette deck is one of a small group of "no compromise" home recorders that can seriously be considered the best that money can buy. In addition to its three heads, dual-capstan transport, and both Dolby-B and Dolby-C noise reduction, the TCD 3014 provides facilities for fine tuning bias, sensitivity, and azimuth that tape aficionados will appreciate. At the same time, however, the deck is designed for ease of operation by those who simply want top-quality sound without fuss.

The TCD 3014 uses separate tape heads for recording and playback. This permits each head's gap width to be optimized for its respective function as well as enabling instant comparison between the input signal and the recorded version. Because of the appreciable distance (approximately 9/16 inch) between the record and play heads, however, imperfections in cassette shells could cause high-frequency losses from azimuth-alignment differences between the heads. To prevent such losses, Tandberg has provided a manual record-head azimuth adjustment and a built-in 15-kHz test-tone generator to help make the adjustment. The procedure takes 15 to 20 seconds to perform and should be done before starting to record each side of a cassette. In most cases, however, skipping the adjustment will not cause any serious sonic harm, and the casual user can probably ignore it at the risk of an occasional dull-sounding tape. The serious recordist, though, will make azimuth calibration a welcome part of his normal routine.

The TCD 3014's closed-loop dual-capstan transport is belt driven by a servo-controlled d.c. motor. This isolates the tape actually passing across the heads from the takeup and feed hubs and thus lowers wow-and-flutter. The diameters and masses of the capstan flywheels are different, so that their mechanical resonant frequencies cannot reinforce each other and thereby increase tape-speed variations. Each hub has its own direct-drive winding motor. These motors are servo-connected to each other so that in fast winding the tape speed remains constant (nominally sixty times playing speed) despite the changing diameters of the two tape packs, which makes the tape winding more uniform. A fourth motor operates the head assembly, pressure rollers, and brakes, eliminating the shocks (and mechanical noise) common in solenoid-operated decks. And the entire transport mechanism (including a massive casting to support the capstan shafts) is built on a 5-millimeter-thick plate.

There is no conventional cassette well or eject mechanism in the TCD 3014. Instead, cassettes are mounted, tape openings downward, directly against the front plate. When any transport button except release is pressed, the cassette is rigidly locked in place between four solid mounting posts and any tape slack is taken up automatically. A light behind the cassette window helps show how much tape remains on a side, and the entire label is fully visible at all times. When the cassette is removed (after pressing release to unlock it), the entire head nest and the roller assemblies are exposed to facilitate cleaning and demagnetizing. To prevent dust accumulation or accidental damage when the deck is not being used, a clear plastic push-on dust cover is provided for the drive section.

The TCD 3014 includes two proprietary Tandberg circuits that are intended to optimize performance. The first is Dyneq, a dynamic-equalization circuit that automatically adjusts the amount of treble boost applied to the tape during recording. Dyneq was developed to maximize the high-frequency storage capacity of the cassette medium. When a tape reaches its high-frequency saturation point-which often happens even at moderate overall program levels because of the record treble boost-its treble storage capacity does not simply level off. Instead, the amount of treble actually recorded diminishes as the treble input is further increased. To minimize this effect, the Dyneq circuitry lowers the treble boost somewhat as the saturation point is approached.

The second special circuit is Tandberg's Actilinear II, a "transconductance" stage at the output of the recording amplifier chain that presents a pure current source to the head. At the same time, the circuit mixes and amplifies the audio and bias signals at a low level, eliminating the need for the usual phase-shifting bias trap at the audio output.

To achieve the lowest possible noise levels, the TCD 3014 uses discrete transistors throughout (except for the Dolby chips) rather than integrated circuits. Similarly, film capacitors rather than electrolytic ones are used for stage-to-stage coupling, and precision low-noise film resistors are used throughout.

Transport operations are controlled by an eight-bit microprocessor in conjunction with a 32K EPROM (Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory). There are six pushbuttons, each with its own red LED indicator, for all the normal transport operations: release, rewind, record, stop, wind, and play. A seventh pushbutton, set, is used to give and store microprocessor instructions when the deck is in either the stop or release mode.

These include resetting the four-digit electronic tape counter, changing the counter to read elapsed time instead of hub revolutions, calibrating the real-time reading for C-60 cassettes (the deck is ordinarily set for C-90's), and setting block markers for memory-rewind stop/replay operation.

Provided they are separated by at least 3 seconds of blank space, up to nine program selections can be quickly located in either direction by holding down the stop button and tapping the appropriate fast-wind button the desired number of times. If the wind or rewind button is held in, the speed of the fast winding is slowed by two-thirds. These two buttons can also be used in conjunction with the play button for audible cue-and-review operation. As in most professional decks, the record button of the TCD 3014 is supplemented with a rec. preset switch (the record LED blinks when the deck is record-ready) so that a single push initiates recording. Alternately pressing play and record changes modes instantly, permitting "flying start" recording and editing. A blank space can be inserted between selections during recording by pressing stop while pushing the record button.

Recording levels are monitored by a pair of equalized peak-reading meters (a welcome change from the usual LED readouts that cannot show the precise strength of a signal between their fixed segments). The meters are calibrated from -20 to +6 dB, with the most critical region (- 3 to +3 dB) marked in 1-dB increments. Because the meters are both peak-reading (they respond to peaks in less than 2 milliseconds) and equalized (they register not only the incoming signal level but also the treble and bass boost applied during recording), Tandberg sets the 0-dB point much nearer the maximum undistorted recording level than Japanese manufacturers typically do. For ferric and Cr02-type formulations (IEC Types I and II) the 0-dB marking is at the IEC reference level of 250 nanowebers per meter. For metal tapes (Type IV), which can be driven harder, Tandberg's 0-dB marking is 4 dB higher (400 nWb/m). This practice takes fuller advantage of the capabilities of today's tapes than the 165-nWb/m 0-dB marking on some Japanese decks, which often results in wasting 6 to 8 dB of headroom.

Recording bias and equalization are set with a three-position front-panel switch, which is flanked by screwdriver-adjusted trimmer controls to optimize the deck for a particular brand of tape. Both 315-Hz and 15-kHz tone generators are built in, and the deck's own meters can be used to do a thoroughly professional job of optimization. Playback equalization is normally selected automatically by sensors that detect the cutouts on the back of a cassette, but for older cassettes that lack these cutouts, a rear-panel switch can be used to select equalization manually.

A large, turned-aluminum knob with an adjustable detent sets the recording levels in conjunction with a smaller channel-balance knob. There are three-position switches to select either no noise reduction, Dolby-B, or Dolby-C and to set the deck for external timer-activated recording or playback. An output control adjusts the monitoring level both at the front-panel headphone jack and at one pair of rear-panel outputs. There are no microphone inputs.

The rear panel contains both fixed-level (0 dB = 0.7 volt) and variable-level output jacks as well as input jacks with sensitivity-adjusting controls to match either American/Japanese or European (DIN) levels. There is also a switch for inserting an FM-multiplex filter for use with those few tuners and receivers that might require it."

Tape speed: 4,75cm /s, 1 7/8 ips
Wow & flutter: 0,06% (WRMS ; play)
0,09% (WRMS ; rec+play)
0,12% (DIN/IEC)
Type IV frequency response: 18Hz...23Khz
± 1,5dB (-20dB)
± 3dB (Dolby C)
Type II frequency response: 18Hz...20Khz
± 1,5dB (-20dB)
Type I frequency response: 18Hz...23Khz
± 1,5dB (-30dB)
THD: < 1% (Type IV ; -250nW/m, Dolby B)
< 2% (Type II ; -250nW/m, Dolby B)
< 1,5% (Type I ; -250nW/m, Dolby B)
S/N ratio: > 74dB (A-weighted)
Crosstalk: < 60dB (side A vs. side B ; 1Khz)
< 40dB (L vs. R ; 1Khz)
Erasure ratio: > 80dB (Type IV ; 1Khz)
Inputs: 150kOhm / 100mV or 10mV
Outputs: 100 Ohm / 700mV (fixed)
100 Ohm / 0...4V (variable)
8 Ohm / 3,5V (headphones)

Dimensions: 17"W x 15"D x 6.5"H. Weight: 22 lbs.

Serial #TEL 652 00325, Tandberg 3014 Cassette Recorder, 115V 60Hz.

 
 
 
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Last Updated on: January 21, 2018
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